One Follow-Up Attempt Is All You Need

Katie Corbett holds the book "2-Hour Job Search"

By Katie Corbett

 

When you are looking for a job or for your next freelance project, it can be easy to get stuck in a cycle of following up with the same prospects over and over. Following up more than once saps time and energy, and it makes you feel like you are being productive when you are not actually reaching out to new people.

 

I read about only following up once in “The 2-Hour Job Search,” by Steve Dalton. Here are some reasons following up only once is preferable.

 

  • You won’t need to worry about annoying anyone.
  • You will be forced to focus on finding fresh leads.
  • You won’t keep contacting the same people over and over.
  • You will be getting work done that gets you closer to your goals.
  • You will be building relationships with new people.
  • The people you have been following up with won’t have to figure out how to get you off their backs.
  • People won’t feel obligated to work with you just to get you to stop following up.
  • You will find people who are ready to take action now.

 

I’ve set a rule in my business that I’m only going to follow up once with new prospects. I’m already excited about how much less stressed I will be as I implement this rule. This will be true, of course, unless more follow-ups are specifically requested. If someone explicitly tells you to follow up at a specific time, definitely do so. I got my first paying case studies writing client because I continued to follow up on the schedule that my prospect requested.

 

When you do reach-outs, try following up only once. Do you notice changes in how you use your time and energy moving forward? Do you notice changes in the number of people you’re able to contact as a result? I’d love to hear more about it, so leave me a comment.

 

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Exposing The Risk of Decision-Making Based on Sunk Costs

Katie Corbett holds the book "2-Hour Job Search"

By Katie Corbett

 

Everything has a cost. Whether it is time, energy, or money, working on projects always involves expenditure of resources.

 

In “The 2-Hour Job Search,” by Steve Dalton, the dangers of sunk costs is discussed. The danger of counting those costs is that you might continue working on a project or working in a job that is no longer good for you because you have put so much time, energy, or money into it already. I’ve found these questions helpful so I don’t get stuck continuing to work on things merely due to sunk costs.

 

  • Does this project still excite me?
  • Do I enjoy working on it?
  • Does it still align with my purpose and goals?
  • Do I still get satisfaction from working on it?
  • Does it still make sense given overall trends?
  • Why should I consider quitting?
  • Could I place this project on temporary hold?
  • Is there another way I could do the same kind of work with a different project?
  • If I continued working on it, what would be the continued costs?
  • Does this project still bring joy to my life?

 

I used these questions to evaluate whether to continue working on my garment project. The answer I came to was that it would be better for me to discontinue that project in favor of working on things that better align with my current activities. I feel very at peace with my decision and am happy I stopped when I did. I’m glad I didn’t continue to move forward on something that no longer made sense, although I’ve put tons of energy, thousands of dollars, and countless hours into it already.

 

Do you have a project you decided to discontinue? How do you feel about that? I look forward to reading your story in the comments.

 

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Landing a Job You Really Want: How to Identify Dream Employers

Katie Corbett holds the book "2-Hour Job Search"

By Katie Corbett

 

When you are looking for a job, it can be fun to think about places you might like to work. You can make a list and reach out to them. I’ve done this several times and frequently gotten interviews.

 

I saw this idea as a suggestion in “The 2-Hour Job Search,” by Steve Dalton. Here is a list of questions I found helpful when hunting down those dream employers.

 

  1. When you were young, where did you think it might be cool to work?
  2. When you watch TV, listen to the radio, and read printed advertisements, what companies stand out to you?
  3. Do you think it might be cool to work for some companies, but are feeling intimidated? What are those companies?
  4. Are there companies you’ve heard of whose mission stands out to you as inspiring?
  5. Look through lists of best places to work in your area. Do any of them stand out to you as cool places to work?

 

I encourage you to make a list of your top ten dream employers. Check within your network to find out if you already know someone who works there. Knowing someone who works there might make it seem less intimidating, and you already have a connection to get your foot in the door.

 

I have a friend who works for Google, and I talked with them about the application and interview process before applying. It was fun to be able to learn what the process was like before applying and know that I knew someone who worked there. Knowing that I applied was cool, even though I didn’t end up progressing beyond to the interview stage. I’m glad that I didn’t let Google’s larger-than-life reputation intimidate me from filling out an application.

 

Have you ever reached out to or applied for a job with a dream employer? How did it go? I’d love to hear your story, so feel free to share it in the comments.

 

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