Keep Feeding Your Curiosity

Katie Corbett holds the book "The Productivity Project."

By Katie Corbett

 

It can be easy to look at everything you are accomplishing in life and feel like you are doing things well enough. If something is working, after all, why change it? I have found it helpful to think of exploring new ideas before making a change, to see if an idea resonates with me before trying it.

 

I love getting new ideas of how to do things better and more efficiently. That’s why I recently read “The Productivity Project”, by Chris Bailey. When it comes to productivity, here is a list of reasons why I’m productive, and why I learn new things.

 

  1. I like exploring new ideas.
  2. I like seeing how others live their lives.
  3. I enjoy experimenting to see what works and what doesn’t.
  4. I want to see what I can accomplish and how far I can push myself.
  5. I love to learn.
  6. I think ideas are some of the most powerful forces in the world.
  7. Exploring ideas and greater efficiency gives me something to talk about with others.
  8. Gathering new ideas reminds me that there is always another way of handling something or of looking at a situation.
  9. Being productive reminds me that I can contribute to the world.
  10. Seeking ways to be more productive gives me a reason to keep learning, growing, and exploring.

 

Greater productivity might not be what motivates you to keep being curious. Here are some questions to ask yourself about why you want to keep using your noodle.

 

  • What do you want to know more about?
  • What benefits would this bring you?
  • What could you do to feed your curiosity that is manageable, given your current level of responsibility?
  • What is one thing you can do each day to grow your knowledge?
  • How will continuing to ask, and find the answers to, questions help you now and in the future?

 

I hope this list of questions motivates you to keep expanding your horizons. I would love to know where your curiosity is taking you. Feel free to leave a comment.

 

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Turning Failure and Mistakes into Success

Katie Corbett holds the book, "The Power of Who"

By Katie Corbett

You might have heard about the importance of failure and learning from your mistakes. Often, it is our greatest failures that teach us how to be successful. In the moment, especially after a grueling defeat, it can be hard to keep that in mind.

“The Power of Who,” by Bob Beaudine, asserts that being able to move forward in the face of failure is an important characteristic of a successful person. Some questions I try to ask myself after failure are:

• In what ways did I cause or allow this to happen
• What happened that was out of my control?
• What have I learned about myself as a result of this experience?
• What have I learned about others, if applicable, after this experience?
• Is there something I can do differently next time?
• What are positives I can take from this situation?
• How has this situation made me stronger?
• What will I need in order to move forward?
• Who can I ask for help and advice?
• What could I learn more about so I can avoid this happening again?

It is my hope that by asking yourself these questions after a setback, it will be easier and quicker to move forward. Failure and mistakes are, unfortunately, a part of life. The sooner we can learn to work through them, the better it will be for our physical, mental, social and spiritual well-being.

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How Reading Stories can Change Your Outlook

Katie Corbett holds the book, "One Minute Millionaire"

By Katie Corbett

It’s important to vary the kinds of books you read. Reading different types of material will help you stay engaged, keep learning and retain new ideas. I discovered this at one of the lowest points of my life.

When I picked up, “The One-Minute Millionaire,” by Mark Victor Hansen and Robert G. Allen, I was broke. None of my job interviews were panning out and I didn’t know what to do next. The book was interesting to me for two reasons: (1) who doesn’t want to be a millionaire, and (2) it was laid out in a unique way. The right-side pages are written telling a fictional story of a person who becomes a millionaire. The left-hand pages are organized into standalone lessons for implementing the system and becoming a millionaire yourself. Words, phrases and page numbers from the left side of the book are referenced throughout the story on the right. Since I was in such a dark place in my life, I read the story first.

I was relieved when the fictional story held my attention for an extended period of time. I was so stressed by my current circumstances that it felt good to escape into someone else’s life for a while. While reading the book didn’t immediately improve my finances, it fought off the fear and anxiety I felt so I could tackle the problem more creatively and positively.

At a time when it would have been easy to get analysis paralysis, reading a story helped me keep learning. I learned that my mindset and staying positive were very important, and that I could change my mindset no matter how much—or how little–money I had in the bank. Reading about a fictional character struggling through her own negative self-talk made me feel less alone and I learned, through her relatable, albeit fictional example, how to change thought patterns in the midst of everyday life and personal struggles.

Reading in story form allowed me to retain new ideas better than if I were simply reading a step-by-step guide. It has been three years since I first picked up “The One-Minute Millionaire.” I have not read it every day or even referred back to it many times at all. Yet I am constantly putting its ideas and principles into practice each day in my life, career and business. I know I would not have retained the information nearly as well if it hadn’t been delivered in such an entertaining and engaging fashion.

I’m not a millionaire yet. I’m on my way to getting there. I know I wouldn’t be on this journey without having first read “The One-Minute Millionaire.” I encourage you to pick up a copy, suspend any doubt, fear or skepticism as you read, and prepare to be amazed at your own ingenuity and resourcefulness.

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