The 11 Words That Will Change Your Life

Katie Corbett holds the book "Fanatical Prospecting"

By Katie Corbett

 

It might be the end of a long day. You are likely tired. You have worked hard and you are ready to call it quits. Before you rush out the door, let these words of advice remain in your memory: “When it is time to go home, make one more call.” I’ve done this, and the advice has been a game-changer in my business. Don’t believe me? I’ll explain how.

 

I read these 11 words in the book, “Fanatical Prospecting” by Jeb Blount. He said that whenever he is tired at the end of a long day, he thinks of these words and acts on them. I recall that he has them taped up somewhere in his office. Though I do cold LinkedIn messaging rather than cold calling as Jeb does, I have found this advice to be fruitful.

 

Once, I was searching on LinkedIn for people to message. It took longer than usual and I was getting ready to give up. I thought of these words and figured I would do just one more reach-out. It turned out to be a great decision, because that person ended up being my next paying client.

 

Whether you are requesting informational interviews, sending out updates to people who know you are job hunting, or calling companies to learn of open positions, I hope you will remember those 11 words of wisdom. Even when you’re tired, hungry, or feel like giving up, just make one more call (or send one more email, or LinkedIn connection request, etc.).

 

Do you have a down-to-the-wire success story to share? I’d love to hear it. Feel free to leave it in the comments.

 

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How to Set Yourself up for 90 Days of Job Seeking Success

Katie Corbett holds the book "Fanatical Prospecting"

By Katie Corbett

 

“The prospecting you do in this 30-day period will pay off in the next 90 days. ” I read that advice in a book about sales and have found it to be applicable in my own business. It could work for job hunting as well.

 

In “Fanatical Prospecting” by Jeb Blount, this rule is touted as a major success principle that, if ignored, can spell trouble in the future. Here are some tips to make the next 30 days of reaching out easier.

 

Tip 1: Think about your current life load and decide on a reasonable number of reach-outs you want to do each day or week.

Tip 2: Remember that this is a marathon and not a sprint.

Tip 3: Track your progress.

Tip 4: Make sure results are something you can control, such as the number of people you will email each day.

Tip 5: Set a time and a reminder in your calendar to do reach-out activities.

Tip 6: Have a script to make the process more automatic.

Tip 7: Develop a follow-up plan.

Tip 8: Decide on a rewards system to keep yourself motivated.

Tip 9: Do your job hunting activities early in the day.

Tip 10: Do job hunting only on weekdays to give yourself a break.

 

Talking with people consistently will help you share about what you do. These tips have helped me find jobs, and make networking and sales just another thing I do in my business. I hope you find these tricks helpful, too.

 

Have a tip that you plan to work on? Let me know in the comments.

 

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Objectives for Prospecting, Job-Seeker Edition

Katie Corbett holds the book "Fanatical Prospecting"

By Katie Corbett

 

Last week, I wrote about the importance of creating a job hunting activities list. The next question that naturally arises is: What counts as a job hunting activity? I’ll break that down in this article.

 

In “Fanatical Prospecting,” by Jeb Blount, objectives are clearly defined relating to sales conversations. Since job hunting is essentially selling oneself, I wanted to list objectives related to job hunting. Here is the list:

 

  1. Learn about open positions. This can be done by conducting a brief online search, talking to employees, and attending job fairs. This could also happen through cold calling, informational interviewing, or setting a job search alert on a job board.
  2. Informational interviews. These are a great way to learn more about what it is like to work for a specific company or the ins and outs of doing a specific job. This is not the time to ask if the company is hiring, although that might come up naturally throughout the conversation (but only if the person you’re talking with brings it up). I once had an informational interview with the CEO of a company and she was so impressed with me that she followed up a few days later and ended up getting me a job.
  3. Update on progress. After you have started conversations with people at various companies, you will want to update them on the progress of your job search. This is particularly important if they put you in contact with someone else at the company. You’ll also want to update the rest of your network on a regular basis if you’re job hunting.
  4. Build familiarity. Continuing to follow up with people and have conversations in a friendly and non-pestering manner will grow your know, like, and trust factor. People help those they know, like, and trust.

 

Each of your job search activities should fall into one of these categories. Before having a conversation, consider which objective it fulfills. Is it a conversation to gather information about openings? Will you be emailing to update this person on your job search progress? Your conversations will be more fruitful once you have established an objective.

 

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Know Your Numbers: The More You Prospect, The Luckier You’ll Get

Katie Corbett holds the book "Fanatical Prospecting"

By Katie Corbett

 

When I was job hunting, I discovered that the more activities I did that related directly to talking with people and following up on job leads, the more likely it was that I would land a job. This might seem like common sense, but it can be easy to get caught up in the false sense of accomplishment that comes from filling out job applications, so I wanted to stress this point. There is an entire hidden job market that is based on who you know and who you talk with, and I have heard of people landing jobs without filling out a single job application. I’ve done this four time in my career, so I know it’s possible.

 

I read a book called “Fanatical Prospecting,” by Jeb Blount, and this idea applies in sales, too. To help me stay on track, I made a list of all my job hunting activities. Here are some tips if you want to create your own job hunting activities list.

 

  1. Count the number of weekdays in the next month.
  2. Write down three job hunting activities you want to do each day.
  3. Make sure each activity involves interacting with a person.
  4. Remember to include follow-ups in your list.
  5. If you have items on your list that make you nervous, schedule an appointment in your calendar to get them done early in the day.
  6. As you get job interviews and informational interviews scheduled, add them to your list.
  7. Choose a way that you will reward yourself each day as you complete the three tasks.
  8. Once you accomplish the three job hunting tasks for the day, give yourself the rest of the day to relax.
  9. Find a friend who might be willing to serve as an accountability buddy; you might find it helpful to call, email, message, or text that person when you have completed your three daily tasks.
  10. At the end of the month, make a list for the next month.

 

I hope you find these tips helpful as you create your job hunting activities list. I found this to be the quickest way to land a job. It works especially well when you have a specific type of job you are aiming to find.

 

Was one of these tips particularly helpful? Let me know in the comments.

 

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